Checkout Usability: One Less Cart Abandoned

 
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“69% of all e-commerce visitors abandon their shopping cart.” Baynard.com

 

No one likes standing in lines. Yes, this includes onlines. The mental process of a customer during an online check out is no different than one in a physical store.

If the line is too long and they can do without the product, the consumer will leave.

If they can find a more convenient location for the same quality product, they will.

If the assistance is unhelpful or the process is unclear, a negative review will make its way to all social media outlets.

If the surprise at the checkout is anything but a discount or a free item, they will leave disgruntled and feeling deceived.

If there is only one payment option, you just cut your customer E-base.

Reaching the checkout does not promise purchase. Shoppers still have time to abandon cart  between the time of checkout and clicking the buy button.

Formisio.com:

Most of the percentages on this pie chart could be avoided simply by changing your checkout process. Let’s walk through how to lessen cart abandonment for each section highlighted in the chart.

Shipping Costs 28%
Make your shipping prices are obtainable from the beginning.

         “High shipping costs are the number one reason for cart abandonment.” Rejoiner

It will just leave your customers frustrated if they have to near the end to see the added costs. More often than not, people will abandon cart because they did not expect the shipping costs. Give your customers time to mentally process shipping charges, by making the prices available early in the checkout process. People don’t like to be caught off guard.

Account Creation 23%

Always have a guest option.

 

Don’t force membership. Shoppers want to do the least amount of work possible, and whether or not it will save them time in the future often times doesn’t matter in that present moment.  If people are pleased with their initial experience, they will go back and create an account in purchases to follow.

Card Security 13%

Safety first.

The measures being taken to maintain card security must take priority. Disasters are bound to happen without the right protective services in place; even then incidents still occur.  Make sure you are taking the proper steps to implement every security measure to preserve the privacy of customer card information and  communicate  this from the beginning of the checkout process. Notice how JohnLewis.com offers 4 mentions of security reassurance.

 

Just Browsing 16%

A few reminders never hurt.

Sometimes people stumble onto a site, get distracted and leave. Just because they left, doesn’t mean they weren’t interested in what you had to offer. Try sending a follow up email as a friendly reminder that the potential customer left some items in his or her cart.

 

 

Complicated Checkout 12%

Make the process as quick as possible and answers easily available.

People do not want to work to hard to receive a thanks for their order. Make the checkout process as easy as possible: basic information, card numbers and shipping and billing information should be simple and direct.

Avoid assumptions, over communication isn’t harmful unless you have an annoying customer service chat pulling up; anticipate questions beforehand and offer a FAQ or information side bar where they can easily find answers that do not redirect them to another page.  Any steps not related to strictly buying and receiving the purchase should be optional (reviews, surveys, etc).

Couldn’t Find Voucher 8%
All sales, deals, and promo codes made transparent.

If you have vouchers, make sure the customer doesn’t have to work too hard to find the code. If you don’t have a special offer or promotion running, you might want to consider something as simple as offering 10% for signing up for emails or money off a future purchase. Incentive drives sales.

A lot can happen from the time a customer adds an item to their shopping cart, and actually decides to make the purchase. Make sure you are taking all the steps to improve their journey, to ensure a better customer conversion rate.

 

Discern . Engage . Transcend